Friday, April 19

Statistics

These following maps are from the CDC. They show the stroke-related deaths for people 35 and older. We are specifically pointing these statistics out because, in the past, strokes mostly happened in the 65 and older. Now younger people are becoming stroke victims.

Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Adults Aged 35 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in the Southeast, with heavy concentrations of high-rate counties in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and, Arkansas. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Alaska, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, and along the coastal plains of North Carolina and South Carolina.
All adults 35+
Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Hispanics Aged 35 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in Hawaii, Texas, and Colorado. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Oklahoma, California, northern Ohio, southeastern Pennsylvania, and Michigan.
Hispanic Adults 35+
Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Blacks Aged 35 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in parts of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina, and Illinois. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in West Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, northern California, northern Washington state, Oklahoma and New York.
Black Adults 35+

Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Whites Aged 35 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in the Southeast, with heavy concentrations of high-rate counties in Arkansas, West Virginia, Missouri, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, and parts of Texas. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Oklahoma, Illinois, Indiana, North Dakota, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.
White Adults 35+

Deaths caused by stroke age 65+

Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Adults Aged 65 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in the Southeast, with heavy concentrations of high-rate counties in Arkansas, Kentucky, West Virginia, Alabama, and South Carolina. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Oklahoma, parts of Texas, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Montana, California, and Alaska.
Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Hispanics Aged 65 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in Hawaii, Texas, and parts of Colorado and Pennsylvania. Pockets of high-rate counties are also found in California and Michigan.
Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Blacks Aged 65 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in parts of eastern Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Illinois.
Stroke Death Rates for 2014 through 2016 for Whites Aged 65 Years and Older by County. The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in the Southeast, with heavy concentrations of high-rate counties in Arkansas, West Virginia, and Kentucky. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Ohio, Michigan, northern Idaho, and the coastal plains of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.
  • Every year, more thanĀ 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. About 610,000 of these are first or new strokes.*
  • Stroke is the fourth largest cause of death in the U.S.
  • Stroke is the primary cause of permanent, long-term disability
    Eighty-seven percent (87%) of strokes are ischemic, generated by blood-clots in the brain*

Notes

* Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, 2017